Imitrex – Mama En Linea http://mamaenlinea.com/ Wed, 20 Oct 2021 22:13:07 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://mamaenlinea.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.png Imitrex – Mama En Linea http://mamaenlinea.com/ 32 32 Opus Genetics Announces Two Key Executive Appointments | Your money https://mamaenlinea.com/2021/10/20/opus-genetics-announces-two-key-executive-appointments-your-money/ Wed, 20 Oct 2021 11:30:00 +0000 https://mamaenlinea.com/2021/10/20/opus-genetics-announces-two-key-executive-appointments-your-money/ Dr Ash Jayagopal appointed Scientific Director Joe Schachle appointed COO RALEIGH, NC, October 20, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) – Opus Genetics, a patient-centered gene therapy company that develops treatments for inherited orphan retinal diseases, today announced two key appointments within its founding management team. Ash Jayagopal, Ph.D., joined the company as Chief Scientific Officer (CSO) and […]]]>

Dr Ash Jayagopal appointed Scientific Director Joe Schachle appointed COO

RALEIGH, NC, October 20, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) – Opus Genetics, a patient-centered gene therapy company that develops treatments for inherited orphan retinal diseases, today announced two key appointments within its founding management team. Ash Jayagopal, Ph.D., joined the company as Chief Scientific Officer (CSO) and Joe Schachle joined as Chief Operating Officer (COO).

“We were delighted to launch Opus last month to advance an AAV-based gene therapy portfolio to treat neglected and orphan inherited retinal diseases, and we welcome Ash and Joe’s leadership at this important time and fundamental to society, ”said Ben Yerxa, Ph .D., CEO of Foundation Fighting Blindness and Retinal Degeneration Fund, and Interim CEO of Opus. “Ash’s career in discovering and developing therapies for eye disease makes him well suited for the role of Opus CSO, where he will be instrumental in advancing our initial OPGx-001 and OPGx- programs. 002 for Leber’s congenital amaurosis. Additionally, Joe brings extensive operational experience to his role as COO, particularly his expertise in strategic planning, business development and operations, which will be invaluable as we build our business and create a new orphan manufacturing scale and efficiency.

Dr. Jayagopal has over 13 years of experience in drug development, drug delivery platforms, and biomarker development for retinal disease. Prior to joining Opus, Dr. Jayagopal was Executive Director of Discovery Medicine at Kodiak Sciences, where he led the Drug Discovery team and defined the strategy to leverage Kodiak’s biopolymer technology for the administration of large and small molecules in diseases of the retina. Previously, Dr Jayagopal was responsible for molecular pharmacology and biomarkers in ophthalmology at Roche, where he assembled and led a team of over 25 scientists focused on the discovery and validation of biologics, small molecules and gene therapies. for eye diseases, including hereditary. retinal diseases. Dr Jayagopal has also served as an Assistant Professor in the Departments of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences at Vanderbilt Eye Institute and in the Departments of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics at Vanderbilt University Medical Center.

“Opus was formed to bring an unprecedented combination of resources, elite science and the expertise of pioneering ocular gene therapy to support and drive transformative treatments for patients,” said Dr. Jayagopal. “With its advanced pipeline – unique for a company at this stage – Opus has the potential to be at the clinical stage in the short term, and I look forward to working with the team to innovate in finding better treatments for retinal diseases. hereditary.

Mr. Schachle brings over 30 years of life sciences experience to Opus, with specific expertise in strategic and operational planning, business development, marketing and sales, and business intelligence. Prior to joining Opus, Mr. Schachle was Vice President of Customer Experience Activation and Vice President of Global Business Services and Control at Grifols, where he led multiple business departments across multiple business units, managed key cross-divisional initiatives and led the brand’s strategic planning process. Previously, Mr. Schachle was COO of Parion Sciences and was part of the team that found partners for the company’s core programs, with transaction values ​​exceeding $ 1 billion. Mr. Schachle was also Chief Commercial Officer of Inspire Pharmaceuticals, where he oversaw several partnership agreements and promoted three eye care brands, including Restasis®. In addition, he held several sales and marketing leadership roles at GlaxoSmithKline, where he managed several billion dollar brands including Advair®, Imitrex®, Wellbutrin SR®, Epivir® / Retrovir® and Combivir® .

“Opus is designed by and for patients to effectively advance validated science to patients by leveraging manufacturing and scalable and strategic processes,” said Schachle. “I look forward to leading the work to operationalize this unique model to address the significant unmet needs in the treatment of orphan and neglected hereditary retinal diseases. “

Dr Jayagopal holds a doctorate. in Biomedical Engineering from Vanderbilt University and an MBA from the Kelley School of Business, Indiana University. Mr. Schachle holds a Bachelor of Business Administration from James Madison University and an MBA from Old Dominion University.

About Opus Genetics Opus Genetics is a revolutionary gene therapy company for inherited retinal diseases with a unique model and purpose. Backed by the venture capital arm of the Foundation Fighting Blindness, the RD Fund, Opus combines unparalleled insight and commitment to the needs of patients with wholly owned programs in many orphan retinal diseases. Its portfolio of AAV-based gene therapy tackles some of the most neglected forms of inherited blindness while creating a new scale and efficiency of orphan manufacturing. Based in Raleigh, North Carolina, the company leverages the insights of top scientists and the expertise of pioneering ocular gene therapy to seamlessly drive transformative treatments for patients. For more information, visit www.opusgenetics.com.

Media Contact: Heather Anderson 919-827-5539 handerson@6degreespr.com

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Reduce the risk of medication error https://mamaenlinea.com/2021/10/19/reduce-the-risk-of-medication-error/ Tue, 19 Oct 2021 10:08:18 +0000 https://mamaenlinea.com/2021/10/19/reduce-the-risk-of-medication-error/ Dear Mayo Clinic: My friend’s father recently passed away from a medication error. One of her prescriptions was improperly filled and caused a fatal reaction. I take several medications for various conditions. How can I reduce my risk of medication error? Reply: Medication errors are errors in prescribing and dispensing medication. These mistakes hurt hundreds […]]]>

Dear Mayo Clinic: My friend’s father recently passed away from a medication error. One of her prescriptions was improperly filled and caused a fatal reaction. I take several medications for various conditions. How can I reduce my risk of medication error?

Reply: Medication errors are errors in prescribing and dispensing medication. These mistakes hurt hundreds of thousands of people every year in the United States. Common causes of medication errors include drug names that look similar, drugs that look similar, and medical abbreviations. Most medication errors can be avoided.

Knowledge is your best defense against medication errors.

One of the best ways to reduce your risk of medication errors is to take an active role in your health care. Learn about any medications you are taking, including possible side effects. Never hesitate to ask questions or share your concerns with your healthcare provider or pharmacist.

Medication errors can happen to anyone, anywhere, including your home and your health care provider’s office, as well as a hospital, pharmacy, or retirement home. Children are particularly prone to medication errors because they usually need different doses of medication than adults.

Medication errors include confusing ear and eye drops and the wrong dose. For example, if you take an over-the-counter product that contains acetaminophen, such as Tylenol, while you are already taking a prescription pain reliever that contains acetaminophen, you may have taken more than the recommended dose of acetaminophen. putting you at risk for liver damage.

Another example of a possible medication error is taking a depression medication called fluoxetine (Prozac or Sarafem) with a migraine medication called sumatriptan (Imitrex). Both drugs affect the levels of the chemical serotonin in the brain. Taking them together can lead to a life-threatening condition called serotonin syndrome. Symptoms include confusion, restlessness, a fast heartbeat, and an increase in body temperature.

It is important to keep medicines in their original labeled containers and to read the instructions on how to take them carefully.

Don’t assume that chewing a pill is as effective as swallowing it. Some medicines should never be chewed, cut or crushed. It can change the way the body absorbs them. Ensuring an accurate dose of liquid medicine is essential, so avoid using spoons in your cutlery drawer rather than a syringe or dose cup, both of which are available at most drugstores.

Your healthcare provider can help prevent medication errors by using a computer to enter and print, or send prescriptions digitally, instead of writing prescriptions by hand. When you pick up a prescription, make sure it’s the one your healthcare provider ordered. It also allows you to keep the information sheets that accompany your medications.

Another way to reduce the risk of medication errors is to reconcile your medications at each visit with your health care provider. This involves comparing your health care provider’s medication list with the medication list you are taking, which can help avoid medication errors.

It is important to share this information:

>> The names and strengths of all medications you are taking and when you take them, including prescriptions; herbs; vitamins; food supplements; over-the-counter drugs; vaccines; and anything received intravenously, including diagnostic and contrast agents, radioactive drugs, feeding tube supplements, and blood products.

>> All medicines to which you are allergic or which have caused problems in the past.

>> Whether you have new, chronic or serious health problems.

>> If you could be pregnant or are trying to become pregnant.

Also, keep an up-to-date list of all your medications, including over-the-counter medications and supplements, in your wallet, purse, or other safe place.

Being prepared and informed is the best way to avoid health problems.


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Glaxo should consider purchasing a https://mamaenlinea.com/2021/10/14/glaxo-should-consider-purchasing-a/ Thu, 14 Oct 2021 20:40:17 +0000 https://mamaenlinea.com/2021/10/14/glaxo-should-consider-purchasing-a/ Drug advisory group Evaluate thinks GlaxoSmithKline PLC (GSK, Financial) should consider running a run at Biohaven Pharmaceutical Holding Company Ltd. (BHVN, Financial) after the latter recorded exceptional third-quarter sales of its oral migraine treatment, Nurtec ODT. Evaluate believes the addition of Biohaven would not only help remove activist investor Elliott Management from Glaxo’s back, but […]]]>

Drug advisory group Evaluate thinks GlaxoSmithKline PLC (GSK, Financial) should consider running a run at Biohaven Pharmaceutical Holding Company Ltd. (BHVN, Financial) after the latter recorded exceptional third-quarter sales of its oral migraine treatment, Nurtec ODT.

Evaluate believes the addition of Biohaven would not only help remove activist investor Elliott Management from Glaxo’s back, but would give the British pharmaceutical giant a treatment to go along with its migraine drug Imitrex.

It sounds like a good idea, but there seems to be a big problem. Biohaven, with a market cap approaching $ 9 billion, is twice as expensive as it was just six months ago, currently trading at around $ 135.

Glaxo has the resources to close the deal, but the question is whether the potential payoff would be worth it. Nurtec ODT’s net present value, as calculated by Evaluate Omnium, is $ 3 billion. Still, the company has not shied away from making questionable acquisitions, most recently the Tesaro buyout.

Nurtec ODT is the only drug approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment and prevention of migraine headaches. Sales of the drug again exceeded expectations in the third quarter, reaching $ 136 million and bringing total revenue to $ 336 million since the drug’s launch in March 2020, according to the company. Biohaven claims doctors have written over a million prescriptions for the drug.

Revenue exceeded even some of Wall Street analysts’ most optimistic forecasts. Piper Sandler had increased its expected revenue to $ 122 million, while Mizuho Securities had expected revenue of $ 110 million.

Nurtec ODT is now the market leader in new oral migraine medications with more than 60% of brand new prescriptions in its category, according to Biohaven. It first gained US approval as an acute treatment in February 2020 and competes with AbbVie Inc. (ABBV, financier) Ubrelvy and Eli Lilly and Co. (THERE IS, Financial) Lilly’s Reyvow for this use.

Earlier this year, Biohaven received approval to sell Nurtec ODT as a preventative treatment. The other drugs for this indication are all injectables owned by Eli Lilly, Amgen Inc. (AMGN, financial) and Teva (SUITS YOU, Financial). The huge market shares of these companies are vulnerable to Biohaven treatment as it can be taken orally much easier.

A migraine is a headache that can cause a severe throbbing pain or a throbbing sensation, usually on one side of the head, according to the Mayo Clinic. It is often accompanied by nausea, vomiting, and extreme sensitivity to light and sound. Migraine attacks can last for hours or even days, and the pain can be so severe that it interferes with daily activities.

Almost one in four American households includes someone with migraine, reports the Migraine Research Foundation. About 12% of the population – including children – suffer from migraines. About 18% of American women, 6% of men, and 10% of children suffer from migraines. Migraines are more common between the ages of 18 and 44.

The ubiquity of migraine headaches translates into a great business opportunity. 360 Research reports that the “Acute Migraine Drugs Market” will grow at a compound annual rate of 7.3% in terms of revenue over the next five years, with the global market reaching nearly $ 3 billion d ‘by 2026.

Other companies competing in the global migraine market include Pfizer Inc. (PFE, Financial), Novartis (NVS, Financial), Sun Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. (NSE: SUNPHARMA, Financial), Endo International (ENDP, Financial), Merck & Co. Inc. (MRK) and Johnson & Johnson (JNJ, Financial).


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Study: Triptans Provide Best Pain Relief For Migraines, But Have More Side Effects Than Newer Drugs https://mamaenlinea.com/2021/10/11/study-triptans-provide-best-pain-relief-for-migraines-but-have-more-side-effects-than-newer-drugs/ Mon, 11 Oct 2021 16:47:43 +0000 https://mamaenlinea.com/2021/10/11/study-triptans-provide-best-pain-relief-for-migraines-but-have-more-side-effects-than-newer-drugs/ October 11 (UPI) – A class of drugs called triptans remains the most effective treatment for migraines, according to an analysis of data from more than 60 studies published Monday by the JAMA Network Open. Adults treated with a triptan were up to three times more likely to report no pain two hours later than […]]]>

October 11 (UPI) – A class of drugs called triptans remains the most effective treatment for migraines, according to an analysis of data from more than 60 studies published Monday by the JAMA Network Open.

Adults treated with a triptan were up to three times more likely to report no pain two hours later than those given the migraine medication lasmiditan, sold under the name Reyvow; rimegepant, brand Nurtec ODT; or ubrogepant, under the brand Ubrelvy, showed the data.

However, the newer drugs – in classes of drugs called gepants and ditans – appear to have fewer side effects and may be safer for people with a history of heart disease or stroke, they said.

“The newer drugs for the treatment of acute migraine, gepants or ditans, are effective compared to placebo, but they are not as effective as triptans, the standard drug currently prescribed for acute migraine,” said UPI study co-author Dr. Shuu-Jiun Wang. E-mail.

“Nevertheless, gépants and ditans are safe for people with cardiovascular risks, and gépants have a much lower rate of adverse events” compared to triptans, said Wang, neurologist at Alumni General Hospital. fighters from Taipei to Taiwan.

According to the American Migraine Foundation, triptans such as sumatriptan or Imitrex, naratriptan or Amerge, and zolmitriptan or Zomig have been used for years to relieve the pain of acute migraines or severe headaches.

However, the drugs don’t work for all people with migraine and can lead to serious health complications in people with a history of heart disease or stroke, according to the foundation.

The new options mitigate some of these health risks, but they may not be as effective as older drugs, Wang said.

Either way, the triptans outperformed the newer drugs in terms of pain relief, the data showed.

However, rimegepant and ubrogepant were both safer for people with a history of heart disease or stroke, and generally had fewer side effects than triptans, the researchers said.

Common side effects of triptans include nausea, rapid heart rate, fatigue, numbness, and a burning sensation on the skin, according to the American Migraine Foundation.

“These new drugs provide more choices for migraine patients,” Wang said.


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Best OTC Sinus Decongestants https://mamaenlinea.com/2021/10/01/best-otc-sinus-decongestants/ Fri, 01 Oct 2021 15:15:52 +0000 https://mamaenlinea.com/2021/10/01/best-otc-sinus-decongestants/ Best over-the-counter sinus decongestant for allergies: Benadryl Allergy Plus decongestant ultratabs Best over-the-counter sinus decongestant for a headache: Advil Sinus Congestion and Pain Best over-the-counter sinus decongestant nasal spray: Afrin No-Drip Severe Congestion Best over-the-counter sinus decongestant for kids: Little Remedies Decongestant Nasal Drops Best OTC sinus decongestant day / night duo: Sudafed PE Day […]]]>

  • Best over-the-counter sinus decongestant for allergies: Benadryl Allergy Plus decongestant ultratabs
  • Best over-the-counter sinus decongestant for a headache: Advil Sinus Congestion and Pain
  • Best over-the-counter sinus decongestant nasal spray: Afrin No-Drip Severe Congestion
  • Best over-the-counter sinus decongestant for kids: Little Remedies Decongestant Nasal Drops
  • Best OTC sinus decongestant day / night duo: Sudafed PE Day and Night Tablets for Sinus Pressure
  • Best OTC Sinus Decongestant on a Budget: Nasal Decongestant Tablets Cabinet
  • Best over-the-counter sinus decongestant for bedtime: Mucinex Night Shift Cold & Flu

Sinus decongestants are products that can relieve pressure in the head and nose. If you’re having trouble breathing due to a cold, flu, or allergies, these products are designed to relieve your symptoms and help you get on with your day. These medications are available over the counter at affordable prices, but it doesn’t always make it easier to choose the one that’s best for you.

Each over-the-counter (OTC) decongestant formula is different. Some target multiple symptoms and bring together several active ingredients. Others are designed simply to relieve a stuffy nose caused by allergies. Some can make you drowsy, while others can make it hard for you to sleep. Knowing the difference between these products will help you choose the best product for your symptoms and situation.

We’ve rounded up the best decongestants you can buy over the counter to make the decision making process easier.

  • Customer reviews. We have chosen products that have obtained high marks of trust with customers, based on hundreds of verified reviews.
  • Transparency. We have researched products and brands that make realistic and medically based claims on their products.
  • Clinical trials and peer-reviewed literature. We have read what doctors and researchers have observed about the different active ingredients available on the market.

Best over-the-counter sinus decongestant for allergies

Benadryl Allergy Plus Congestion Ultratabs

  • What we liked: These tablets contain diphenhydramine, an antihistamine ingredient that fights allergy symptoms, as well as phenylephrine, which reduces sinus congestion. You can take one of these tablets every 4 hours throughout the day, and reviewers note that they work relatively quickly.
  • What there is to know: These tablets are not intended to fight a flu or a cold, so they should only be taken if your sinus congestion is caused by allergies. You should also be aware that diphenhydramine can make you quite drowsy, so avoid this medicine on days when you need to be alert.

Best over-the-counter sinus decongestant for a headache

Advil Sinus Congestion and Pain

  • What we liked: These coated tablets contain phenylephrine, a proven decongestant ingredient, as well as ibuprofen, a pain reliever. You can take one tablet up to every four hours. The combination of nasal swelling relief and a pain reliever can provide quick relief from many sinus-related headaches. Many reviewers who get frequent sinus headaches swear by this product to be better than even some prescription drugs.
  • What there is to know: Be sure to keep track of how much ibuprofen you are taking if you are using this product. Do not take other pain relievers, such as acetaminophen or aspirin, with this product, unless your doctor tells you to. It’s easy to end up taking a higher than recommended dose of pain relievers when you mix drugs.

Best over-the-counter sinus decongestant nasal spray

Afrin No-Drip Severe congestion

  • What we liked: Nasal sprays like Afrin narrow swollen nasal passages by applying an active ingredient directly to your sinuses. The advantage of this may be that sprays tend to work faster than tablets or liquid decongestants. Afrin spray contains oxymetazoline hydrochloride as well as menthol, which relaxes and refreshes your nasal passages pretty much right away, according to reviews.
  • What there is to know: Afrin should only be used temporarily to relieve sinus congestion. Rebound congestion can occur in as little as 3 days.

Best over-the-counter sinus decongestant for kids

Little Remedies Decongestant Nasal Drops

  • What we liked: These dye-free drops contain phenylephrine in a safe dosage for children 2 years of age and older. The dropper formula can be applied 2 to 3 drops at a time directly to the nasal passages, resulting in quick relief. (No waiting for the tablets to go off at bedtime). This decongestant can work for cold or flu symptoms, or it can be used to help manage congestion caused by allergies.
  • What there is to know: It can be difficult to get toddlers to sit still and have the drops applied to their noses. You may have a better chance to put the preparation in a spray bottle or other mist-based bottle to get your child to cooperate.

Best OTC day / night decongestant duo

Sudafed PE Day and Night Tablets for Sinus Pressure

  • What we liked: These tablets contain phenylephrine to relieve sinus congestion during the day, as well as an additional antihistamine ingredient for nighttime use. These ingredients can treat environmental allergies as well as congestion caused by the common cold. There are 12 tablets meant for daytime use and 8 you can take at night, meaning you can take a few more tablets during the day if you need to, but stick to one just before bedtime once. that you are ready to sleep.
  • What there is to know: There are no pain relieving ingredients included in the day or night formulas of these tablets. This means that if you have a headache and treatment for sinus pressure does not provide relief, you could still find yourself taking acetaminophen at the end of the day.

Best OTC Sinus Decongestant on a Budget

Nasal Decongestant Tablets Cabinet

  • What we liked: This mega container of 225 tablets is a great solution if several people in your family are prone to allergies or sinus headaches. The no-frills phenylephrine formula is comparable to the dosage you’ll find in a brand, but at a fraction of the cost. There is nothing in the formula to make you drowsy, and you can take one pill every 4 hours on days when symptoms hit you hard.
  • What there is to know: Some customers have complained that the bottle is too big to fit in their medicine cabinet, which seems like a small complaint for a product if you use it often. This particular tablet alone targets sinus congestion, so it will not relieve symptoms like fever or cough.

Best over-the-counter bedtime medicine

Mucinex Nightshift Cold & Flu Liquid

  • What we liked: This liquid formula contains a pain reliever, a cough suppressant, and an antihistamine ingredient that work together to give you a good night’s sleep when you’re sick. However, it does not contain any decongestants, so keep that in mind when using this treatment. It’s great for bedtime because it tames coughing fits that can keep you awake at night. Although it does not contain a decongestant, the antihistamine ingredient can also reduce nasal congestion caused by seasonal allergies.
  • What there is to know: Unlike the other decongestants on this list, this product does not contain anything that will release mucus. Some reviewers note that they really don’t like the taste of this drug.

When determining which decongestant to buy, you’ll need to determine the cause of your congestion. If it’s allergies, you’ll probably want a product with an antihistamine ingredient like diphenhydramine.

If you have cold or flu symptoms, you may be looking for a product that contains phenylephrine or pseudoephedrine. Some over-the-counter sinus decongestant formulas include both antihistamines and decongestant ingredients, and some add pain relieving ingredients such as ibuprofen to their formula. Treat the symptoms you have, not the additional symptoms you don’t.

Can / should I take a sinus decongestant for a sinus infection?

You can take certain decongestants for a sinus infection. Decongestants that only contain pseudoephedrine or phenylephrine are more generally recommended for a sinus infection. Decongestants with additional ingredients like antihistamines can suppress your body’s immune response and interfere with your body’s ability to fight infection. If you have a severe sinus infection or are taking antibiotics, talk to your doctor about the best over-the-counter medication choice for you.

Do sinus decongestants work for ear congestion?

Sinus decongestants can relieve pressure in the upper sinus cavities. If you have ear congestion, relieving that pressure can help you manage your pain. But sinus decongestants can’t treat an underlying ear infection.

Is It Safe To Take Sinus Decongestants While Pregnant?

It depends on the active ingredient. Over-the-counter pseudoephedrine and phenylephrine should only be used during pregnancy under the supervision of your doctor. These are Category C drugs and should not be used during the first trimester, but only later on doctor’s recommendation.

Can You Take Sinus Decongestants With High Blood Pressure?

Phenylephrine is not considered safe if you have high blood pressure. Sinus decongestants that contain pseudoephedrine can actually raise your blood pressure and counteract the blood pressure medications you are taking. If you have high blood pressure, you should talk to your doctor about which decongestant they recommend.

The best way to choose an OTC decongestant is to look at the active ingredients. A good decongestant should only treat the symptoms you have, not the additional symptoms you don’t have. Over-the-counter decongestants are not a solution for severe, long-lasting sinus infections and chronic allergies. You may need to discuss a long-term strategy with your doctor if you find that over-the-counter decongestants are not effectively managing your symptoms.


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Reduce the risk of medication errors https://mamaenlinea.com/2021/09/29/reduce-the-risk-of-medication-errors/ Wed, 29 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://mamaenlinea.com/2021/09/29/reduce-the-risk-of-medication-errors/ Credit: CC0 Public Domain DEAR MAYO CLINIQUE: My friend’s father recently passed away from a medication error. One of her prescriptions was improperly filled and caused a fatal reaction. I take several medications for various conditions. How can I reduce my risk of medication error? ANSWER: Medication errors refer to errors in prescribing and dispensing […]]]>

Credit: CC0 Public Domain

DEAR MAYO CLINIQUE: My friend’s father recently passed away from a medication error. One of her prescriptions was improperly filled and caused a fatal reaction. I take several medications for various conditions. How can I reduce my risk of medication error?

ANSWER: Medication errors refer to errors in prescribing and dispensing medication. These mistakes hurt hundreds of thousands of people every year in the United States. Common causes of medication errors include drug names that look similar, drugs that look similar, and medical abbreviations. Most medication errors can be avoided.

Knowledge is your best defense against medication errors.

One of the best ways to reduce your risk of medication errors is to take an active role in your health care. Learn about any medications you are taking, including possible side effects. Never hesitate to ask questions or share your concerns with your healthcare provider or pharmacist.

Medication errors can happen to anyone, anywhere, including your home and your health care provider’s office, as well as a hospital, pharmacy, or retirement home. Children are particularly prone to medication errors because they usually need different doses of medication than adults.

An example of a medication error is taking an over-the-counter product that contains acetaminophen, such as Tylenol, when you are already taking a prescription pain reliever that contains acetaminophen. This error could cause you to take more than the recommended dose of acetaminophen, which puts you at risk of liver damage.

Another example of a possible medication error is taking a depression medication called fluoxetine (Prozac or Sarafem) with a migraine medication called sumatriptan (Imitrex). Both drugs affect the levels of a brain chemical called serotonin. Taking them together can lead to a life-threatening condition called serotonin syndrome. Symptoms of the dangerous drug interaction include confusion, restlessness, rapid heartbeat, and increased body temperature, among others.

It is important to keep medications in their original labeled containers and to carefully read the instructions on how to take the medications. Other medication errors include confusing ear drops and eye drops, chewing non-chewable drugs, cutting pills, and taking the wrong dose.

Don’t assume that chewing a pill is as good as swallowing it. Some medicines should never be chewed, cut or crushed. It can change the way the body absorbs them. Ensuring an accurate dose of liquid medicine is essential, so avoid using spoons in your cutlery drawer rather than a syringe or dose cup, both of which are available at most drugstores.

Be proactive and review your medications regularly, especially when starting a new medication.

Ask your doctor or pharmacist these questions:

  • What is the brand or generic name of the drug?
  • What is the medicine supposed to do? How long will it take before I see results?
  • What is the dose? How long should I take it?
  • What should I do if I miss a dose?
  • What should I do if I accidentally take more than the recommended dose?
  • Are there any foods, drinks, other medications, or activities that I should avoid while taking this medication?
  • What are the possible side effects ? What should I do if they happen?
  • Will this new medication interfere with my other medications? If so, how?

Your healthcare provider can help prevent medication errors by using a computer to enter and print, or send prescriptions digitally, instead of handwriting them. When you pick up a prescription, make sure it’s the one your healthcare provider ordered. It also allows you to keep the information sheets that accompany your medications.

Another way to reduce the risk of medication errors is to reconcile your medications at each visit with your health care provider. This involves comparing your health care provider’s medication list with the medication list you are taking, which can help avoid medication errors.

It is important to share this information:

  • The names and strengths of all medications you are taking and when you take them, including prescriptions; herbs; vitamins; food supplements; over-the-counter drugs; vaccines; and anything given intravenously, including diagnostic and contrast agents, radioactive drugs, feeding tube supplements, and blood products.
  • Any medicine you are allergic to or which has caused problems in the past.
  • Whether you have new, chronic or serious health problems.
  • If you could be pregnant or are trying to become pregnant.

Also, keep an up-to-date list of all your medications, including over-the-counter medications and supplements, in your wallet, purse, or other safe place. Being prepared and informed are the best ways to avoid health problems.


Medication errors: reduce your risk with these tips


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Quote: Q and A: Reducing the Risk of Medication Errors (2021, September 29) retrieved October 12, 2021 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2021-09-medication-errors.html

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How to Get Rid of Migraine at Work: Treatment and Prevention https://mamaenlinea.com/2021/09/29/how-to-get-rid-of-migraine-at-work-treatment-and-prevention/ Wed, 29 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://mamaenlinea.com/2021/09/29/how-to-get-rid-of-migraine-at-work-treatment-and-prevention/ Taking pain relievers, avoiding triggers, and having a strong support system can help a person get rid of a migraine episode at work – or at least reduce their migraine symptoms. Migraine is a neurological condition that can cause moderate to severe pain, nausea, and sensitivity to light or sound. Sometimes people can stop the […]]]>

Taking pain relievers, avoiding triggers, and having a strong support system can help a person get rid of a migraine episode at work – or at least reduce their migraine symptoms.

Migraine is a neurological condition that can cause moderate to severe pain, nausea, and sensitivity to light or sound.

Sometimes people can stop the progression of a migraine episode and continue to work. However, there may be days when it is necessary to come home.

Read on to learn more about stopping the progression of a migraine episode at work and for tips on managing and preventing the episodes.

One of the main symptoms of a migraine is a headache, and this can be the most debilitating symptom when trying to work out. For many people, the first line of defense against pain is medication.

People can try the following options.

Over-the-counter pain medications

Over-the-counter pain relievers, such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), may stop the progression of a migraine episode in some people.

Examples of NSAIDs are:

For best results:

  • Choose an NSAID that has worked well in the past. Alternatively, a person may want to choose one that works quickly.
  • Take NSAIDs as soon as migraine symptoms start to appear, even if they are mild. For example, if a person has migraine with aura, they can take NSAIDs when the aura begins.
  • Do not take more than one NSAID at a time and follow the directions on the pack, unless directed by a doctor.

Some people should not take NSAIDs. Additionally, frequent use of NSAIDs may be associated with a higher risk of high blood pressure and peptic ulcers. For this reason, a person should check with a doctor that it is acceptable for them to take NSAIDs before use.

Triptans

Triptans, or serotonin receptor agonists, are a type of prescription medication that helps relieve migraine pain. They increase serotonin in the brain, which helps reverse inflammation in nerves and blood vessels.

Triptons are available as oral swallowable tablets, oral dissolving tablets, nasal sprays, and injections.

Some common triptans include:

  • almotriptan (Axert)
  • eletriptan (Relpax)
  • frovatriptan (Frova)
  • naratriptan (Amerge)
  • rizatriptan (Maxalt)
  • sumatriptan (Imitrex)
  • sumatriptan / naproxen sodium (Treximet)
  • zolmitriptan (Zomig)

Triptans are not preventative drugs. They can help relieve pain when a person experiences a sudden migraine. People should use them as directed by a doctor.

Other methods

If a person is not taking pain relievers, they can try to reduce the discomfort in other ways. These options may not stop the migraine, but they can make the pain and sensitivity to light less severe.

For example, a person can try:

  • move to a quiet, dark room
  • applying a cold compress to the head, eyes, or neck
  • take a nap

In some people, migraine episodes also cause nausea and sometimes vomiting. There are several ways to relieve these symptoms.

People can try the following options.

Antinausea drugs

Doctors can prescribe medication for people who often experience nausea or vomiting when they have migraine episodes. In some people, these medications can also help relieve other symptoms of migraine.

Some anti-nausea medications can be taken with pain relievers or triptans. As with pain relievers, it is best to take them as soon as the first symptoms of migraine appear, as directed by a doctor.

Natural remedies

Some people find natural remedies helpful in relieving nausea. However, it should be noted that some of them have strong smells or flavors, which can be unpleasant during a migraine episode.

People may want to try:

  • consuming ginger tea or candy
  • drink mint tea
  • deep breathing
  • staying hydrated with sips of water

Learn more about home remedies for nausea here.

Sometimes it is not possible to get rid of the symptoms of migraine at work. In fact, according to the Migraine Research Foundation, over 90% of migraine sufferers are unable to work during a migraine. So if medications and other remedies don’t help you may need to go home.

In these situations, it can be helpful to have an advocate in the workplace. She’s someone who can recognize when symptoms become unmanageable and talk about a person’s needs when they’re not feeling well.

A lawyer could:

  • notify a supervisor of the situation
  • make sure the person is transported home
  • manage any tasks or responsibilities left behind
  • tidy up and close the person’s workspace
  • check in with them once they get home

Ask someone who is trustworthy and reliable and who understands migraine if they would be willing to do it.

Migraine is a chronic disease that can impact a person’s career over the course of their life. The United States alone is losing about 157 million workdays per year because of this.

So it makes sense to have a plan and work support system in place to help minimize the disruption that a migraine can cause.

First, a person may consider informing others in the workplace about their condition, if they feel comfortable doing so.

For example, they may want to disclose it to their:

  • immediate supervisor
  • human resources (HR) representative
  • colleagues in the same office or team

It is important that these people understand what it means to have a migraine. Migraine is not just a “bad headache”. Getting a doctor’s note explaining the condition might help.

Then the person can make a plan for the onset of migraine symptoms. This plan may include:

  • dim lights and computer screens
  • reduce office noise, such as music, conversations, or ringing phones
  • reduce strong odors, such as heavy perfumes, cleaning products, or food
  • delegate tasks to others
  • take a break in another room

Yes, migraine symptoms can cause some degree of disability. The degree of impairment it causes can vary from person to person depending on the severity or frequency of symptoms.

Legally, a person in the United States is protected by the Americans with Disabilities Act if their condition “significantly limits one or more major life activities.” This includes work.

This means that a person who frequently has difficulty working because of a migraine may be entitled to workplace accommodations. Some may also have access to disability benefits.

Workplace arrangements

Not all migraine sufferers benefit from workplace accommodations, but making small changes can make a big difference in symptoms.

For example, an HR representative may be able to organize:

  • cabin doors or shields
  • headphones or earmuffs
  • carpet or other materials to reduce noise
  • less harsh or bright lighting or that reduces glare
  • flexible working hours
  • the possibility of working from home
  • tips to help with stress management

Disability benefits

In the United States, there are several types of disability benefits: Short Term Disability, Long Term Disability, and Social Security Disability Income (SSDI).

Typically, short and long term disability benefits are available through a person’s health insurance. Employers often offer these benefits, but sometimes people buy separate short-term or long-term disability insurance plans. A person with migraine can check with their employer for more details.

SSDI, on the other hand, is administered by the Social Security Administration. Because SSDI is a federally funded program, most people are only eligible if they have worked long enough and recently enough and paid taxes in the Social Security system.

Learn more about applying for SSDI benefits due to migraine here.

With medical care, it may be possible to reduce the frequency of migraine episodes. A doctor or neurologist may develop a migraine prevention plan, which may involve avoiding triggers and taking preventative medications.

Not everyone can identify specific migraine triggers, but some common examples include lack of sleep, stress and anxiety, bright lights, strong smells, and certain foods and drinks.

Some medications that can help reduce episodes include:

Learn more about migraine prevention here.

Migraine rarely requires emergency medical attention. However, it is important to call 911 or the nearest emergency service number if someone develops any of the following symptoms:

In addition, pain relievers can sometimes cause serious side effects. Seek help immediately if any new or worrying symptoms develop after taking over-the-counter or prescription medications.

A person may be able to get rid of the symptoms of a migraine at work by using over the counter medications or prescription migraine medications. Using them as early as possible is important because it gives them the best chance to work effectively.

In addition to pain relievers, anti-nausea medications and nausea remedies can help. Finding a quiet, dark place to take a break can also ease the intensity of some of the symptoms.

Employers and coworkers need to understand migraine and how it affects a person’s work, as it is a very common chronic condition in the United States and often makes it difficult to work during episodes.

When symptoms improve, consider workplace accommodations and create a migraine plan to reduce its impact.


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Shapes, strengths, use, etc. https://mamaenlinea.com/2021/09/25/shapes-strengths-use-etc/ Sat, 25 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://mamaenlinea.com/2021/09/25/shapes-strengths-use-etc/ Imitrex (sumatriptan) is a brand name prescription medicine. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved it to treat migraine with or without aura. Imitrex is available as an injection, tablet, and nasal spray. Injection forms are also approved for treating cluster headaches. It is important to note that Imitrex is not approved to help prevent […]]]>

Imitrex (sumatriptan) is a brand name prescription medicine. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved it to treat migraine with or without aura. Imitrex is available as an injection, tablet, and nasal spray. Injection forms are also approved for treating cluster headaches.

It is important to note that Imitrex is not approved to help prevent migraines or cluster headaches.

The active medicine in Imitrex is sumatriptan. And Imitrex is available as a generic drug sumatriptan. Imitrex belongs to a class of medicines called serotonin agonists (triptans).

For more information on Imitrex dosages, including its forms, strengths, and how to use the medicine, keep reading. For a complete overview of Imitrex, check out this article.

This article describes the typical dosages of Imitrex supplied by the manufacturer of the drug. When using Imitrex always follow the dosage prescribed by your doctor.

Imitrex is available in several different forms and strengths, which are described below. The form and strength prescribed by your doctor will determine the dose of Imitrex you use.

Imitrex shapes

Imitrex comes in these forms:

  • liquid solution administered by subcutaneous injection with either:
    • STATdose pen and pre-filled cartridge
    • single-dose vial for use with a syringe
  • oral tablets
  • nasal spray

Imitrex strengths

The forms of Imitrex are available in the strengths listed below. Milligrams and milliliters are abbreviated as mg and ml.

Typical dosages

Usually your doctor will start giving you a low dose. Then they’ll adjust it over time to reach the amount that’s right for you. Your doctor will ultimately prescribe the smallest dose that provides the desired effect.

The following information describes the strengths commonly used or recommended. However, be sure to take the dosage prescribed by your doctor. Your doctor will determine the best dose for you.

Dosage for migraine

The dosage of Imitrex for migraine with or without aura depends on the form of Imitrex prescribed by your doctor.

Dosage of oral tablets

To treat migraine, Imitrex oral tablets (pills) can be given at a dose of 25 mg, 50 mg or 100 mg. You should take your dose when you first experience symptoms of a migraine, but you can take a dose anytime during the migraine.

If the first dose does not completely relieve your migraine episode, you may take a second dose. But you should wait at least 2 hours after your first dose before taking another dose.

Dosage of nasal spray

To treat migraine, Imitrex nasal spray may be prescribed in doses of 5 mg, 10 mg, or 20 mg. The 5 mg and 20 mg doses require a single spray into one nostril. The 10 mg dose requires a spray of the 5 mg dose into each nostril.

If the first dose does not completely relieve your migraine episode, you may take a second dose. But you should wait at least 2 hours after your first dose before taking another dose.

STATdose pen and vial dosage

To treat migraine, the recommended starting dose with the STATdose pen or vial is a single 6 mg dose. If the side effects of this strength are bothersome, your doctor may prescribe a lower dose of 1 mg to 5 mg. (To learn more about the side effects of Imitrex, check out this article.)

The STATdose pen uses pre-filled single-dose cartridges, so it can only deliver 4 mg or 6 mg doses. For other prescribed doses, you should use the single-dose vial.

If the first dose does not completely relieve your migraine episode, you may take a second dose. But you should wait at least 2 hours after your first dose before taking another dose.

Dosage for cluster headaches

Only injection forms of Imitrex are approved for treating cluster headaches. These forms are the pen and the STATdose vial. You can find the dosages below.

STATdose pen and vial dosage

To treat cluster headache, the recommended dose with the STATdose pen or vial is 6 mg.

If the first dose does not completely relieve your cluster headache, you may take a second dose. But you should wait at least 2 hours after your first dose before taking another dose.

Maximum dosage

The maximum dose of Imitrex per day depends on what form of Imitrex you are using:

  • oral tablet: 200 mg over 24 hours
  • nasal spray: 40 mg over 24 hours
  • STATdose pen or vial: 12 mg over 24 hours

Long term use

Imitrex is intended for use as a long-term treatment. If you and your doctor determine that Imitrex is safe and effective for you, you will probably use it for the long term.

Below are answers to some frequently asked questions about Imitrex dosages.

What is the maximum dose of Imitrex per month?

It is not known whether it is safe to use Imitrex to treat more than four headaches per month (30 days). Your doctor can give you more information about how to use Imitrex safely to treat migraine or cluster headache.

If you would like to learn more about the maximum daily doses of Imitrex, see “Maximum dose” in the “Dose of Imitrex” section above.

Why don’t the pill or nasal spray forms of Imitrex treat cluster headaches?

The pill and nasal spray forms of Imitrex have not been shown to be safe and effective in treating cluster headaches. This is why these forms are not approved to treat the disease.

Only the injection forms of Imitrex have been shown, through clinical studies, to be safe and effective for the treatment of cluster headaches.

Talk to your doctor if you want to learn more about Imitrex or other treatments for cluster headache.

Find the dosing instructions for how to use each form of Imitrex below.

Dosage instructions for oral tablets

You will take Imitrex oral tablets by mouth. When you notice symptoms of migraine, you swallow a tablet whole with water or other liquid.

Dosage instructions for nasal spray

For Imitrex nasal spray, you will insert the unit (disposable device) into one nostril and spray once. To view step-by-step instructions for using Imitrex nasal spray, see the instructions for using the medication.

Dosage instructions for the STATdose pen or vial

The instructions for using the pen and the STATdose vial differ slightly. Your doctor or other healthcare professional can show you how to use either form correctly.

To use the STATdose pen, you must charge the device with a cartridge. You then give yourself a dose by subcutaneous injection. Your doctor will tell you where on your body to inject your doses. Make sure to hold the pen against your skin for at least 5 seconds when injecting a dose. To view detailed instructions for using the pen, refer to the instructions for use of the medicine.

To use the single-dose vial, you will use a syringe and needle to withdraw your dose from the vial. Your doctor or healthcare professional will give you instructions on how much Imitrex to use. They will also tell you where on your body to inject the doses.

The dose of Imitrex prescribed by your doctor will depend on several factors. These include:

  • the type and severity of the disease for which you are using Imitrex
  • what form of Imitrex you are using
  • side effects * you experience while using Imitrex

Other medical conditions you have may also affect your dose of Imitrex.

* To learn more about the side effects of Imitrex, see this article.

Dosage adjustments

If your doctor prescribes Imitrex oral tablets for you and you have liver problems, your dose may be adjusted. You can speak with your doctor to find out more.

Also, if you are 65 years of age or older, you may be given a lower starting dose of Imitrex than usual. This is how your doctor can see how the medicine is affecting you. Elderly people may have an increased risk of side effects from Imitrex. Your doctor can give you more information.

Imitrex is not a medicine that you take every day. Since you only use the medicine as needed when you have a cluster headache or migraine, you cannot miss a dose.

It is best to take a dose of Imitrex as soon as your symptoms start. But you can take a dose anytime you have a migraine or cluster headache.

It is important that you do not use more Imitrex than your doctor tells you to. For some medications, taking more than the recommended amount may cause side effects or overdose.

If you take more than the recommended amount of Imitrex

Call your doctor at once if you think you have taken too much Imitrex. Another option is to call the American Association of Poison Control Centers at 800-222-1222 or use their online tool. If you have severe symptoms, immediately call 911 or your local emergency number, or go to the nearest emergency room.

The dosages in this article are typical dosages provided by the manufacturer of the drug. If your doctor recommends Imitrex, they will prescribe the dosage that is right for you. Always take the dosage prescribed by your doctor.

As with any medicine, never change your dose of Imitrex without your doctor’s advice. If you have any questions about how much Imitrex is right for you, talk to your doctor.

In addition to learning more about the dosage, you may want other information about Imitrex. You may find these additional articles helpful:

Disclaimer: Medical News Today has done everything possible to ensure that all information is accurate, complete and up to date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare practitioner. You should always consult your doctor or other healthcare professional before taking any medicine. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or possible side effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a particular drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.


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Medicines for migraine for prevention and to reduce the pain of attacks https://mamaenlinea.com/2021/09/15/medicines-for-migraine-for-prevention-and-to-reduce-the-pain-of-attacks/ Wed, 15 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://mamaenlinea.com/2021/09/15/medicines-for-migraine-for-prevention-and-to-reduce-the-pain-of-attacks/ Medicines for migraine fall into two broad categories: medicines designed to reduce pain and other symptoms, and those designed to prevent headaches. Migraine medications that reduce the symptoms of a migraine attack are sometimes called reliever medications. “The primary goal of reliever medications is to achieve relief from pain, associated symptoms, and disability within two […]]]>

Medicines for migraine fall into two broad categories: medicines designed to reduce pain and other symptoms, and those designed to prevent headaches.

Migraine medications that reduce the symptoms of a migraine attack are sometimes called reliever medications.

“The primary goal of reliever medications is to achieve relief from pain, associated symptoms, and disability within two hours of using them,” said Jeffrey H. Frank, MD, headache specialist at the Norton Neuroscience Institute.

Rescue medication should not be used more than twice a week due to the risk of headaches from overuse of medication.

“In the treatment of migraine, we often suggest using higher doses of medication at first and then backing off if there are any side effects,” Dr. Frank said. “The goal here is to be painless with tolerable side effects rather than having pain and having no side effects.”

A number of medications that are not specifically intended for migraine attacks can reduce symptoms. These include:

  • Gepants, a new class of treatment, blocks CGRP, a brain protein identified as a migraine trigger. The treatments have a relatively low risk of serious side effects and a low risk of drug abuse. Rimegepant is approved both for the acute treatment of migraine attacks and as a preventative medication. Ubrogepant is available to treat attacks. Another drug is currently in clinical trials for the treatment of migraine attacks.
  • Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as ibuprofen and naproxen sodium, can be purchased over the counter. Diclofenac (Cambia) and ketorolac (Toradol) are available by prescription.
  • Acetaminophen usually does not help severe migraine attacks, but can be used for mild headaches.
  • Excedrin, a combination of acetaminophen, aspirin, and caffeine, is approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for mild migraine attacks.
  • Eight medicines specifically for migraine attacks belonging to a class of medicines called triptans: Amerge, Axert, Frova, Imitrex, Maxalt, Relpax, Zomig and Treximet.

“The sooner you take the triptans, the better they work,” Dr. Frank said.

Axert, Maxalt, Relpax and Zomig are fast acting. Amerge and Frova are slow-acting, which means they stay in the system longer and can be used in combination with other medicines such as naproxen or Cambia.

Preventive migraine medications are designed to reduce the number of migraine attacks.

“Who needs preventive drugs? Patients who frequently use reliever medications may be on the verge of developing headaches related to the overuse of medication, ”said Dr. Frank.

Preventive medications can also help people with crippling migraine attacks who don’t respond to reliever medications, or someone who just wants to keep the headaches from coming on rather than treating them symptomatically.

Antiepileptic drugs are the most frequently used preventive drugs, Topamax being the most prescribed of them.

“It’s effective in almost 50% of the patients who take it,” Dr Frank said of Topamax.

Topamax can have serious side effects, including numbness and tingling in the hands and feet and sometimes around the mouth, and cognitive difficulties such as being unable to find words. It can reduce sweating, which means athletes who take it are at risk of overheating. It has also been linked to birth defects and may also decrease the effectiveness of oral contraceptives.

An alternative for people who cannot tolerate Topamax is Zonegran. This is another anti-epileptic drug that can be used as a migraine preventative medicine, although the side effects are similar. Other anti-epileptic drugs that can be used as preventative drugs include Depakote and Valproate, although their side effects include weight gain and hair loss.

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Other migraine preventative medications include:

  • Rimegepant is approved for both the prevention and the treatment of symptoms. Another preventative drug is in clinical trials.
  • Antidepressants such as Elavil and Pamelor, which cause drowsiness and are taken at night. Vivactil is stimulating and taken three times a day. Others, including Prozac, Celexa, Effexor, Cymbalta, and Pristiq, can also be used.
  • Medicines for high blood pressure, including propranolol, metoprolol, nadolol, verapamil, and diltiazem.
  • Vitamin supplements, including magnesium and riboflavin, and herbs such as butterbur and feverfew.
  • Botox injections, effective for chronic migraine, defined as more than 15 headache days per month. Botox treatment involves injections at 31 sites every three months.

“Most of the patients who get it and have a good response don’t mind the 31 Botox injections. They feel it’s a small price to pay for three months of good headache control, ”said Dr. Frank.

Monoclonal antibody injections are the latest FDA approved migraine medications, along with drugs such as Emgality and Ajovy.

“The goal of treatment is to decrease the frequency and severity of headaches,” said Dr. Frank, “not to get rid of headaches completely.”



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Reduce long-term drug costs and more https://mamaenlinea.com/2021/08/31/reduce-long-term-drug-costs-and-more/ Tue, 31 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://mamaenlinea.com/2021/08/31/reduce-long-term-drug-costs-and-more/ Sumatriptan is a generic prescription drug. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved it to treat migraine in adults. Migraine is a disease that can cause severe headaches and other symptoms, such as nausea. Some people have sensory changes before a headache, called an aura. Sumatriptan can be taken to treat migraine that occurs with […]]]>

Sumatriptan is a generic prescription drug. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved it to treat migraine in adults.

Migraine is a disease that can cause severe headaches and other symptoms, such as nausea. Some people have sensory changes before a headache, called an aura. Sumatriptan can be taken to treat migraine that occurs with or without aura.

Drug details

Here are some details about sumatriptan:

  • Drug class: triptan
  • Drug forms:
  • Brand versions:

Read on to learn more about sumatriptan and its cost, as well as how to save money on prescriptions.

As with all medicines, the cost of sumatriptan can vary. Factors that can affect the price you will pay include your treatment plan, insurance coverage, and the pharmacy you use.

You may also need to purchase needles and syringes if you are using certain injected forms of sumatriptan.

To find out how much sumatriptan costs to you, talk to your doctor, pharmacist or insurer.

Here are the answers to some frequently asked questions about the cost of sumatriptan.

Does the cost of sumatriptan vary depending on the form of medicine I am taking (tablet, nasal spray or powder, injection)?

Yes, the cost of sumatriptan can vary depending on what form of medicine you are taking. The cost per pill may be different from the cost per injection, for example.

If you want to know more about the cost of different forms of sumatriptan, talk to your pharmacist. They will probably be able to estimate what you will pay for each form of medication.

How much does sumatriptan cost without insurance?

The cost of sumatriptan with or without insurance may vary. In general, costs are generally higher without insurance. But your pharmacist can help you determine what you’re likely to pay for the drug based on your insurance coverage.

Can the cost of sumatriptan change depending on how much strength I take?

Yes, the cost of sumatriptan can vary depending on how much strength you take.

Sumatriptan is available in the following forms and strengths:

If you want to know more about the costs of different forms and strengths of sumatriptan, talk to your pharmacist. They will likely be able to give you an idea of ​​what you will pay based on your prescription.

Sumatriptan comes in the following branded forms:

  • Imitrex
  • Onzetra Xsail
  • Tosymra
  • Zembrace SymTouch

A generic drug is an exact copy of the active drug found in a brand name drug. The generic is considered to be as safe and effective as the original medicine. And generics tend to cost less than brand name drugs. To find out how the cost of a brand name form compares to the cost of sumatriptan, talk to your doctor, pharmacist, or insurer.

If your doctor has prescribed sumatriptan for you and you want to use a brand name form instead, talk to your doctor. They may have a preference for one version or another. You will also need to check with your insurer, as they may only cover one or the other.

Read on for some tips on how to cut the long term costs of sumatriptan.

Obtain a 3 month supply

You may be able to get a 90 day supply of sumatriptan. If your insurance company approves it, getting a 90-day supply of the drug could reduce your number of trips to the pharmacy and help lower the cost. If this option interests you, check with your doctor or insurer.

Using a mail order pharmacy

Sumatriptan may be available at a mail order pharmacy. Using this type of service can help reduce the cost of the medication and allow you to receive your medication without leaving home. Some health insurance plans can help cover the cost of mail order drugs. You can also get a 90-day supply of the drug by mail order.

If you don’t have health insurance, talk to your doctor or pharmacist. They may be able to suggest online pharmacy options that might be right for you.

If you need financial support to pay for sumatriptan, consider checking out websites that offer resources and cost information. Two of these organizations are:

These sites can provide details on drug assistance programs, ways to get the most out of your insurance coverage, and links to savings cards and other services.

Now that you know the cost and sumatriptan, you may still have some questions. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist, who can provide personalized advice on cost issues. If you have health insurance you will need to speak with your insurer to find out the actual cost you would pay for sumatriptan.

Here are some other resources you may find helpful:

Disclaimer: Medical News Today has done everything possible to ensure that all information is accurate, complete and up to date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare practitioner. You should always consult your doctor or other healthcare professional before taking any medicine. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or possible side effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a particular drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.


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